Animals in UK Law

Leading Cases
  • R (British Union for Abolition of Vivisection) v Secretary of State for the Home Department
    • Queen's Bench Division (Administrative Court)
    • 25 Abr 2008

    The BUAV criticised Dr Richmond's silence on the apparent lack of post-operative overnight monitoring of these animals and of others. Professor Flecknell and Dr Lewis, who has advised the BUAV, agree that in the case of these and other animals if there was no overnight monitoring the care provided was less than optimum.

  • R (Compassion in World Farming Ltd) v Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
    • Queen's Bench Division (Administrative Court)
    • 27 Nov 2003

    Approximately 44 billion broiler chickens are reared worldwide each year. There are two groups of broiler chickens: ordinary broilers, reared for their meat, and the breeding flock, whose role it is to produce the chicks which will be killed for their meat. In 2002 the United Kingdom reared approximately 810,000,000 broilers for meat and approximately 680,000,000 female breeder chicks.

    Nearly all broilers reared in the United Kingdom are kept in factory farms. Broiler chickens reared for their meat reach their slaughter weight, typically around 2 kg, within about 40 days of being hatched. They would not reach adulthood until about 18 to 24 weeks of age. Broilers are thus very young animals for the whole of their fast-growing period. By selective breeding, the length of time which broiler chicks take to grow to 2 kg has been approximately halved in the last 30 years.

    With measured and appropriate forcefulness Mr Singh took issue with this opinion. He defined it as the deliberate infliction of hunger, where broilers are being denied what they want, for the sake of commercial gain. But animals are exploited by humans for any number of purposes including, in a number of different circumstances, commercial gain.

  • Cummings v Granger
    • Court of Appeal
    • 26 May 1976

    The Section is very cumbrously worded and will give rise to several difficulties in future. Those circumstances are "particular circumstances" within Section 2(2) (b). It was "due" to those circumstances that the damage was likely to be severe if an untruder did enter on its territory. Section 2(2)(c): Those characteristics were known to the keeper. It follows that the keeper of the dog is strictly liable unless he can bring himself within one of the exceptions in Section 5.

  • Mirvahedy v Henley
    • House of Lords
    • 03 Feb 2005

    It is expressed in general, abstract terms and it has to be applied to a wide range of disparate incidents.

  • R (British Union for Abolition of Vivisection) v Secretary of State for the Home Department
    • Court of Appeal
    • 30 Jul 2008

    Yet the nature of the claimants' case is to challenge a composite scientific judgment based more upon an expert analysis of scientific material than upon the application of hard-edged terms of a document amenable to lawyers' construction. The scientific judgment is not immune from lawyers' analysis. But the court must be careful not to substitute its own inexpert view of the science for a tenable expert opinion.

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