European Journal of Probation

Publisher:
Sage Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
2021-09-06
ISBN:
2066-2203

Latest documents

  • Developing evidence based practice skills in youth justice

    A number of studies have found that when probation officers, and others who supervise young people and adults on community based orders, have good intervention skills their clients are more likely to be engaged in supervision and to have low recidivism rates. The skills include, role clarification, pro-social modelling, problem solving, cognitive and relationship skills. Little research has been done, however, on the development of these skills across whole organisations. This study aimed to examine the extent to which training and coaching of probation officers, across two state youth justice departments in Australia, improved the use of workers’ skills. Audio-tapes of worker/client interviews were provided to research staff before and after training and coaching. Analysis of the audio-tapes found a significant increase in the overall use of worker skills following the training and coaching. However, the increases in the skills applied largely to role clarification, rather than pro-social modelling, problem solving and cognitive skills.

  • Book Review: Queer Criminology
  • Sensing probation in Canada: Notes on affect and penal aesthetics in risk assessment

    Based on 6 years of probation practitioner experience in a metropolis of Canada, I provide an autoethnographic account reflecting on my fieldwork as I now commence doctoral studies. Contributing to discussions of experience in the penal atmosphere, I explore personal ethics and values, looking specifically to LSI-R software, where my experience with risk-based programming indicates a subjugation of both supervisees and supervisors. Studying penal aesthetics within the version of the software I used to assess criminogenic risk thus elucidates why evaluators tend to score their risk ratings upward rather than downward. Implications for a desistance paradigm are juxtaposed to the RNR model of offender management, where sensing visual and haptic stimuli pertains to an algorithmic governance mode limiting human connection. I conclude by reflecting on organisational values and behaviour to indicate where therapeutic alliances with criminalised people intersect criminalisation and desistance.

  • Building accountability and client–officer relationships through videoconferencing: Exploring best practices for community corrections

    The COVID-19 pandemic forced community corrections agencies worldwide to use remote technologies to prevent the spread of the virus. A growing body of the literature suggests that video-conferencing is poised to be a core practice within community correctional settings. However, little is known about the best practice strategies for incorporating videoconferencing into routine supervision. We address this gap by interviewing and conducting focus groups with a sample of community correction officers from the US (N = 16). We identified the presence of the law enforcement—social work dichotomy in remote settings, reflected in challenges and opportunities when holding clients accountable and establishing client–officer relationships. Our findings show that officers relying on evidence-based practices (EBPs) were able to use videoconferencing tools to overcome remote challenges. We suggest that establishing in-person relationships, adapting EBP, and taking care of logistics are critical steps to strengthen remote accountability and client–officer relationships. We conclude by discussing future research areas.

  • Book Review: Challenging bias in forensic psychological assessment and testing. Theoretical and practical approaches to working with diverse populations
  • Book Review: Facilitating desistance from aggression and crime. Theory, research, and strength-based practices
  • Serious mental illness in probation: A review

    Research into serious mental illness and probation is reviewed. In addition, there is a specific review of the role of specialist mental health probation staff in the United States (US). In the discussion, we compare progress with the care of the seriously mentally ill within probation in Europe and the US. We conclude that the specialist role for probation staff developed in the US has significant advantages which have been well evaluated which should be implemented, in a large multi-centre trial, across Europe.

  • The European survey of probation staff’s knowledge of, and attitudes to, mental illness

    There is a high prevalence of mental health disorders on probation staffs' caseloads. Approximately 40% of all clients will have a mental health disorder often compounded by drug or alcohol problems. It is therefore important that a probation officer can recognise mental illness and refer to the appropriate local agency. It is therefore important to know how much probation staff understand about mental illness. The Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS) was distributed to probation staff in all countries registered as members of the Confederation of Europe. In this paper, overall average scores for the MHLS for each country are presented. Factors which help to explain the variation in scores are also examined such a caseload size and gender of staff member. The results are discussed within the context of a possible European curriculum for probation training. Probation (CEP) organisation.

  • The European survey of probation staff’s knowledge of, and attitudes to, mental illness

    There is a high prevalence of mental health disorders on probation staffs' caseloads. Approximately 40% of all clients will have a mental health disorder often compounded by drug or alcohol problems. It is therefore important that a probation officer can recognise mental illness and refer to the appropriate local agency. It is therefore important to know how much probation staff understand about mental illness. The Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS) was distributed to probation staff in all countries registered as members of the Confederation of Europe. In this paper, overall average scores for the MHLS for each country are presented. Factors which help to explain the variation in scores are also examined such a caseload size and gender of staff member. The results are discussed within the context of a possible European curriculum for probation training. Probation (CEP) organisation.

  • Serious mental illness in probation: A review

    Research into serious mental illness and probation is reviewed. In addition, there is a specific review of the role of specialist mental health probation staff in the United States (US). In the discussion, we compare progress with the care of the seriously mentally ill within probation in Europe and the US. We conclude that the specialist role for probation staff developed in the US has significant advantages which have been well evaluated which should be implemented, in a large multi-centre trial, across Europe.

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