Amicus Curiae in UK Law

Leading Cases
  • Airedale NHS Trust v Bland
    • House of Lords
    • 04 Feb 1993

    In both cases it was possible to make a value judgment as to the consequences to a sensate being of in the one case withholding and in the other case administering the treatment in question. In the case of a permanently insensate being, who if continuing to live would never experience the slightest actual discomfort, it is difficult, if not impossible, to make any relevant comparison between continued existence and the absence of it.

    On the latter aspect I would adopt the very blunt words of Scalia J. in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health (1990) 110 S.Ct. 2841, 2859, where a very similar problem arose in a different constitutional and legal framework. These are problems properly decided by the citizens, through their elected representatives, not by the courts.

  • Rondel v Worsley
    • House of Lords
    • 22 Nov 1967

    I pass, therefore, to consider whether so far as concerns what is said or done in the conduct or management of a case in Court the public interest requires that an advocate should have immunity. Is it, then, desirable in the public interest, while rejecting the wide immunity which has hitherto been proclaimed, to retain an immunity relating only to the limited field of the conduct and management of a case in Court?

  • Locobail (U.K.) Ltd v Bayfield Properties Ltd
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 17 Nov 1999

    By contrast, a real danger of bias might well be thought to arise if there were personal friendship or animosity between the judge and any member of the public involved in the case; or if the judge were closely acquainted with any member of the public involved in the case, particularly if the credibility of that individual could be significant in the decision of the case; or if, in a case where the credibility of any individual were an issue to be decided by the judge, he had in a previous case rejected the evidence of that person in such outspoken terms as to throw doubt on his ability to approach such person's evidence with an open mind on any later occasion; or if on any question at issue in the proceedings before him the judge had expressed views, particularly in the course of the hearing, in such extreme and unbalanced terms as to throw doubt on his ability to try the issue with an objective judicial mind (see Vakauta v. Kelly (1989) 167 CLR 568); or if, for any other reason, there were real ground for doubting the ability of the judge to ignore extraneous considerations, prejudices and predilections and bring an objective judgment to bear on the issues before him.

  • R v H and Another
    • House of Lords
    • 05 Feb 2004

    It is very well-established that when exercising a range of functions the Attorney General acts not as a minister of the Crown (although he is of course such) and not as the public officer with overall responsibility for the conduct of prosecutions, but as an independent, unpartisan guardian of the public interest in the administration of justice: see Halsbury's Laws of England, 4th ed (1995), vol 44(1), para 1344; Edwards, The Law Officers of the Crown, 1964, pp ix, 286, 301-302.)

  • Attorney General v Blake
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 16 Dic 1997

    There is, however, no possibility that this case will reach a higher Court. The Crown is unlikely to seek to appeal this case in view of our decision on the public law claim. The defendant has taken no part in the proceedings; and an amicus curiae has no standing to appeal.

  • Airedale NHS Trust v Bland
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 09 Dic 1992

    At no time before the disaster did Mr Bland give any indication of his wishes should he find himself in such a condition. It was accordingly with the concurrence of Mr Bland's family, as well as the consultant in charge of his case and the support of two independent doctors, that the Airedale NHS Trust as plaintiff in this action applied to the Family Division of the High Court for declarations that they might

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