Conjoined Twins in UK Law

Leading Cases
  • Re A (Children) (Conjoined Twins: Surgical Separation)
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 22 Set 2000

    The availability of such a plea of quasi self-defence, modified to meet the quite exceptional circumstances nature has inflicted on the twins, makes intervention by the doctors lawful. The availability of such a plea of quasi self-defence, modified to meet the quite exceptional circumstances nature has inflicted on the twins, makes intervention by the doctors lawful.

    The Convention does not in any way restrict a contracting state as to how the most serious form of homicide is defined in its domestic law.) The Convention does not in any way restrict a contracting state as to how the most serious form of homicide is defined in its domestic law.)

    The Convention is to be construed as an autonomous text, without regard to any special rules of English law, and the word "intentionally" in Article 2(1) must be given its natural and ordinary meaning. The Convention is to be construed as an autonomous text, without regard to any special rules of English law, and the word "intentionally" in Article 2(1) must be given its natural and ordinary meaning.

  • Murray v Big Pictures (UK) Ltd
    • Chancery Division
    • 07 Ago 2007

    The point that needs to be emphasized is that the assessment of the impact of the taking and the subsequent publication of the photograph on the child cannot be limited by whether the child was physically aware of the photograph being taken or published or personally affected by it. The Court can attribute to the child reasonable expectations about his private life based on matters such as how it has in fact been conducted by those responsible for his welfare and upbringing.

  • R (on the application of Nicklinson and another) v Ministry of Justice; R (on the application of AM) v DPP
    • Supreme Court
    • 25 Jun 2014

    Third, the Parliamentary process is a better way of resolving issues involving controversial and complex questions of fact arising out of moral and social dilemmas. The legislature has access to a fuller range of expert judgment and experience than forensic litigation can possibly provide. It is better able to take account of the interests of groups not represented or not sufficiently represented before the court in resolving what is surely a classic "polycentric problem".

  • Nicklinson v Ministry of Justice; R (on the applicaion of AM) v DPP
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 31 Jul 2013

    The Policy certainly does not lead to what would otherwise be an extraordinary anomaly, that those who are brought in to help from outside the family circle, but without the natural love and devotion which obtains within the family circle, are more likely to be prosecuted than a family member when they do no more than replace a loving member of the family, acting out of compassion, who supports the "victim" to achieve his desired suicide.

  • Nicklinson v Ministry of Justice [QBD]
    • Queen's Bench Division
    • 12 Mar 2012

    The first declaration is sought on the basis that the common law defence of necessity is available to a charge of murder in the case of voluntary active euthanasia and/or to a charge under section 2(1) Suicide Act 1961 in the case of assisted suicide provided that: (a) the Court has confirmed in advance that the defence of necessity will arise on the facts of the particular case; (b) the Court is satisfied that the person is suffering from a medical condition that causes unbearable suffering; there are no alternative means available by which his suffering may be relieved; and he has made a voluntary, clear, settled and informed decision to end his life; (c) the assistance is to be given by a medical doctor who is satisfied that his or her duty to respect autonomy and to ease the patient's suffering outweighs his or her duty to preserve life.

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