Contract Law in UK Law

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Leading Cases
  • Bell v Lever Bros Ltd
    • House of Lords
    • 15 Dic 1931

    A. would never have entered into the bargain if he had known the fact. They can be supported on the ground that it is of paramount importance that contracts should be observed: and that if parties honestly comply with the essentials of the formation of contratcs, i.e., agree in the same terms on the same subject matter, they are bound: and must rely on the stipulations of the contract for protection from the effect of facts unknown to them.

    "In the contemplation of both parties fundamental to the continued validity of the contract," "a foundation essential to its existence," "a fundamental reason for making it" are phrases found in the important judgment of Scrutton L.J. in the present case. Nothing is more dangerous than to allow oneself liberty to construct for the parties contracts which they have not in terms made by importing implications which would appear to make the contract more businesslike or more just.

  • Fibrosa Spolka Akcyjna v Fairbairn Lawson Combe Barbour Ltd
    • House of Lords
    • 15 Jun 1942

    It is clear that any civilised system of law is bound to provide remedies for cases of what has been called unjust enrichment or unjust benefit, that is to prevent a man from retaining the money of or some benefit derived from another which it is against conscience that he should keep.

  • Whitworth Street Estates (Manchester) Ltd v James Miller and Partners Ltd
    • House of Lords
    • 03 Mar 1970

    I must say that I had thought that it is now well settled that it is not legitimate to use as an aid in the construction of the contract anything which the parties said or did after it was made. Otherwise one might have the result that a contract meant one thing the day it was signed, but by reason of subsequent events meant something different a month or a year later.

  • Davis Contractors Ltd v Fareham Urban District Council
    • House of Lords
    • 19 Abr 1956

    So perhaps it would be simpler to say at the outset that frustration occurs whenever the law recognises that without default of either party a contractual obligation has become incapable of being performed because the circumstances in which performance is called for would render it a thing radically different from that which was undertaken by the contract.

  • White and Carter (Councils) Ltd v McGregor
    • House of Lords
    • 06 Dic 1961

    It may well be that, if it can be shown that a person has no legitimate interest, financial or otherwise, in performing the contract rather than claiming damages, he ought not to be allowed to saddle the other party with an additional burden with no benefit to himself. If a party has no interest to enforce a stipulation he cannot in general enforce it: so it might be said that if a party has no interest to insist on a particular remedy he ought not to be allowed to insist on it.

  • Investors Compensation Scheme Ltd v West Bromwich Building Society
    • House of Lords
    • 19 Jun 1997

    (1) Interpretation is the ascertainment of the meaning which the document would convey to a reasonable person having all the background knowledge which would reasonably have been available to the parties in the situation in which they were at the time of the contract.

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Legislation
  • Consumer Rights Act 2015
    • England & Wales
    • 1 de Enero de 2015
    ...... 1 . Consumer contracts for goods, digital content and services PART 1 . Consumer contracts for goods, digital content and services . CHAPTER 1 . Introduction . S-1 . ......
  • Data Protection Act 2018
    • UK Non-devolved
    • 1 de Enero de 2018
    ...... (c) (c) it does not fall within Article 22(2)(a) or (c) of the GDPR (decisions necessary to a contract or made with the data subject’s consent). . (4) Where a controller takes a qualifying significant decision in relation to a data subject based ......
  • Insurance Act 2015
    • UK Non-devolved
    • 1 de Enero de 2015
    ... . . Insurance Act 2015 2015 CHAPTER 4 . An Act to make new provision about insurance contracts; to amend the Third Parties (Rights against Insurers) Act 2010 in relation to the insured persons to whom that Act applies; and for connected ......
  • Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977
    • UK Non-devolved
    • 1 de Enero de 1977
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Books & Journal Articles
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Law Firm Commentaries
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