Book Review: Canada

Published date01 September 1951
DOI10.1177/002070205100600313
Date01 September 1951
246
INTERNATIONAL
JOURNAL
him,
for
his
viewpoint
is
from
somewhere
on
the
right..
He
is
not
on
the
extreme
right
but
he
has
his
admiration
for
the
drum
and
trumpet
side
of
empires.
This
is
his
privilege,
if
it
does
not
become
jingoism,
and
it
does
not,
though
here
and
there
it
approaches
closely
to
that
attitude.
In
a
book
so
crowded
with
detail,
one
naturally
looks
to the
standard
of
accuracy.
For
those
parts
of
the
story
which
do
not
deal
with Canada
or
North
America,
this
seems
high.
That
may
reflect
the
gaps
in
the
reviewer's
own
knowledge,
for
when
it
comes
close
to
home,
many
errors,
of
varying
magnitudes,
of
both
fact
and
interpretation,
become
visible.
At
the
same
time,
the
author's
personal
knowledge
of
this
country
and
of
other
parts
of
the
English-speaking
world
gives his pages
a sense
of
reality
that
cannot
come
out
of
books
alone,
even
if
it
is
a
reality
rather
too
close
to
the
"ruling-class"
mentality
to
be
entirely
in
harmony
with the
psychology
of
highly
equalitarian
peoples.
The
book's
wealth
of
material
may
be
judged
from the
list
of
illustra-
tions
(32),
maps
(42) and
graphs
(6).
No
references
are furnished.
Anyone
who
attempts
such
an
enormous
canvas and
succeeds
in
getting
some
clear
picture
on
it
has my
respect:
this
book
in
the
quantity
of
the information
it
furnishes,
the
varied approach
to
the
problems
involved
(a
series
of
population
curves,
for
example,
indicate
a
width
of
viewpoint
not
often possessed
by
the
conventional
political
historian),
its
generous
tone,
will
prove
valuable
for
all
interested
in
one
of
the
world's
greatest
political
experiments.
Queen's
University,
May
1951.
A.
R.
M.
Lower
CANADA.
Edited
by
George
W.
Brown.
1950.
(Berkeley
and
Los
Angeles:
University
of
California
Press.
Toronto:
University
of
Toronto Press.
xviii,
621
p.
$6.50,
members
$5.20.)
A galaxy
of
twenty-six prominent
Canadian
social
scientists
has
joined
with
the
editor
in
producing
an illuminating
portrayal
of
mid-
twentieth
century
Canada
that
deserves
wide
reading
on
this
continent
and
abroad.
Divided
into
six
parts,
the
first
provides the
setting
in
able
sketches
of
the
basic
pattern
of
Canadian
life
and
of
the
influence
of
geographic
forces.
Part
Two
traces
the historical background
from
the
founding
of
French
Canada,
through
the
British
colonial
period,
the
genesis
and
growth
of
the
Dominion,
to
the national
maturity
that
has
emerged
with
two world
wars.
Part
Three
furnishes
the
fundamental
and
historic
elements
that
shaped the
Canadian
economy,
the
characteristic
features
of
maritime,
lowland,
prairie
and
other
regions,
and
a
superb
analysis
of
trends
in
economic
development
that
are
closely
integrated
with
the
world
situation.
Part
Four
analysizes
the
constitutional
and
political
scene
with
a
clarity and
freshness
of
interpretation
that
should
prove
inviting
reading to
both
the
politician
and the
general
citizen.
Here
one

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