Book Review: La Democratie Industrielle et les Comites D'Enterprise en Suede

DOI10.1177/002070205100600323
Date01 September 1951
Published date01 September 1951
BOOK
REVIEWS
257
helped
us
to
control
famine
and
disease.
The
fault
is
not
in
the
machine,
but
in
us.
Man's
inhumanity
to
man
is
no
new development,
and
the
victims
of
Nero
or
Genghis
Khan
probably
suffered
as
much
and
as
unjustly
as
the
victims
of
Gheorghiu's
machine
monster. And
while
conditions
in
the
machine-age
are
bad,
it
is
at
least
debatable
whether
they
are
worse
than
in
the
undeveloped
areas
of
Asia
and
South
America
where
millions
never
know
what
it
is
to
have
enough to
eat
and
where
the
death
rate
is
many
times
higher than
in
industrialized countries.
Nor
does
Gheorghiu's equating
of
Nazis, Communists, and
American
officials
carry
conviction.
As
he
so
forcibly
points
out,
the
evils
of
bureaucracy
are present
in every
modern
state,
but
in
some
states those
evils can
still
be
criticized,
and
as long
as
they
can
be
criticized
there
is
some
hope
that
they
can
be
corrected. Indeed,
Gheorghui
himself
seems
to have
come
to
that
conclusion,
for
he
told
an
American
correspondent:
"As
a
European
I
cannot
accept
your
civilization,
but
I
pray
morning,
noon,
and
night,
that
of
the
two
alternatives
facing
the
world
today,
yours
will
triumph."
Nor
in his
despair
as
ultimate
as
The
Twenty-Fifth
Hour
indicates.
He
is
now
reported to
be
writing
a
sequel called
The
Second
Chance.
Toronto,
April
1951.
Edith
Fowke
LA
DEMOCRATIE
INDUSTRIELLE
ET
LES
COMITES
D'ENTERPRISE
EN
SUEDE.
Par
Charles
L6ger.
1950.
(Paris:
Cahiers
de
la
Fondation
Nationale
des
Sciences
Politiques-Librairie
Armand
Colin.
x,
227 pp.)
M.
Charles
Iger's
work
on
industrial
democracy
in
Sweden
is
the
first
comprehensive
study
published
on
this
important
subject.
He
gives
a
detailed
analysis
of
the
origins
and development
of
"works
commit-
tees"
in
Swedish
industries
as
they
are established
under
the
"Saltsj6-
baden
agreement"
of 1946,
in
which
are
embodied
legislation
and
prac-
tice
of
industrial
democracy
in
Sweden.
This
book should
do
much
to
clarify
certain
misconceptions
current
in
many
places
about the
part
played
in
Sweden
by
the State
in
relations
between employers
and
employees
and
between
the
Trade
Unions
and
the
Federation
of
Employers
which
are
the
two leading
organisations
confronting
each
other
in
that
country.
It
will
be
seen
first
of all
that
the
Swedish organizations
of
works
committees
is
extremely
complex,
both
in
its
structure
and its
applica-
tion.
The
procedure
attending
their
creation,
and the
limitation
set
to
the
questions they
may
discuss
and
to
the
decisions
they
may
take,
are
very
intricate and subject
to
a
strict
control
both from
the
Trade
Unions
and
from
the
Federation
of
Employers.
Both these groups
have
shown
themselves
at
all
times suspecious
of
State
interference and sought
to

To continue reading

Request your trial

VLEX uses login cookies to provide you with a better browsing experience. If you click on 'Accept' or continue browsing this site we consider that you accept our cookie policy. ACCEPT