Book Review: India and the United States

DOI10.1177/002070205100600321
Date01 September 1951
Published date01 September 1951
254
INTERNATIONAL
JOURNAL
authoritarian
Spanish
juristics;
the
Supreme
Court
cannot
arbitrate the
constitutional
validity
of
laws,
machinery
of
appeal
is
deficient,
and
the
whole
system
of
local
justices
needs
reform.
But
in
his
cautious
tribute
to
the
moderately
enlightened
dictatorship
of
the
Carias
regime,
he
shows his
awareness
that
only economic
stability and
progress,
increased
transport
and
education,
can remove
the
twin
banes of
Honduran
political
life-caudillismo,
the
fanatical
personalism
from
which
spring
party
divisions
and
party
spoils
systems,
and
machetismo,
rule
by
the
Caribbean
general-utility
knife.
In
Honduras'
126-year
history,
there
have been
116
presidents,
only
a
handful
of
whom
have
reached
power
without
violence.
Education,
economic
stability,
transport-and
the
greatest
of
these
is
transport.
Only
a
Caribbean
can
know
the
social
revolution
accom-
plished
in
that
area
by
the airplane
and the
refrigerated
cargo-ship;
Mr.
Stokes
gives only an
inkling
of
the
tremendous
changes
brought
about
by
the
appearance
of
the
United
Fruit
Company
on
Honduras'
north
coast.
Many
of
the
Honduran
people's
basic
deficiencies-the
localism
which
has
produced
caudillismo,
and made
popular
election and
the
jury
system
unworkable
in
the
past--can
be
overcome
by
closer
co-operation with
their
neighbours, perhaps
even
with
the
new
Caribbean
federation,
in
bringing
Honduras
and
its
hinterland
out
of
its
comic-
opera
remoteness.
The
G~ilvez
regime
seems
at
least
willing
to
speed
completion
of
the
mid-section
of
the Pan-American Highway.
The
excellent
photographs
by
Henry
D.
Guilbert
do
much
to
lighten
the
book's
academic
tone.
There
is
an
appended
text
of
the
constitution
of
1936,
a
list
of
Honduran
presidents,
and
an
analysis
of
legislation
passed
between
1896
and
1941.
In
a
second
edition,
the
reference
to
"judicial
immortality"
on p. 129
should
perhaps
be
corrected.
University
of
Toronto.
Ronald
Bryden
INDIA
AND
THE
UNITED
STATES.
By
Lawrence
K. Rosinger.
Published
under
the
auspices
of
the
Institute
of
Pacific
Relations.
1950.
(New
York,
Toronto:
Macmillan.
149
pp.
$3.25,
members
$2.60.)
Few
subjects
are
more
important than
the
one on
which
Mr.
Rosinger
has
written
in this
book.
Both
the United
States
and
India
are
assuming
international
r6les
since
World
War
II
which
make
them
of
far
greater
importance
to
each
other
than
ever
before.
As
Mr.
Rosinger
points
out,
and
as
the
divergences
of
policies
over
Korea
underlined,
there
is
far
too
little
knowledge
of
India's
problems and
attitudes
in
the United
States
outside
the
State
Department-perhaps
even
too
little
there.
Unfortunately
this
book
does
not present
as
broad
and
vivid
a
picture
of
India
as
could
have
been
desired.
There
is
little
of
its
back-
ground
history,
with
the
all-too-slow development
towards
indepen-
dence; little
attempt
to
sketch
the
growth
of
nationalism,
which
inevi-

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