Book Review: South-East Asia: The Papua-New Guinea Elections 1964

AuthorR. S. Milne
Date01 June 1967
Publication Date01 June 1967
DOI10.1177/002070206702200241
SubjectBook Review
350
INTERNATIONAL
JOURNAL
affirmations
are
more
than
mere
guesses,
where
is
the
documentation.
A
final
word
of
criticism
relates
to
Tarling's habit
of
fashioning
cum-
brous
sentences
and
his
using
overnumerous pronouns
often
with
little
concern
for
antecedents.
Conciseness
has
its
drawbacks.
Ohio
University
JOHN
F
CADY
THE
PAPUA-NEw
GUINEA
ELECTIONS
1964.
Edited
by
David
G.
Bettison,
Colin
A.
Hughes,
Paul
W
van der
Veur.
1965.
(Canberra.
Australian
National
University.
Vancouver-
University
of
British
Columbia.
xi,
545pp.
$10.00)
The
professional
conscience
of
political scientists,
especially
those
who
study
elections,
is
now
highly
developed. The
Preface
to
this
book
starts
as follows:
"In
May
1963,
the
three
editors
almost simultaneously
became concerned
at
the
possibility
that
the forthcoming
general
elections
in
Papua-New
Guinea
might
occur
without
being
observed
and
recorded
in
an appropriate
manner"
The
appearance
of
the
book
indicates
that
the
elections were
observed
and
recorded.
The
generally
high
standard
of
the
contributions
testifies
that
the manner
was also
"appropriate.
The
only
major
criticism
is
that
some
of
the
contributions
(by
sixteen
authors,
mostly
from the
Australian
National
University)
might
have
been
more
severely
edited
and
pruned.
However,
apart
from
a
number
of
introductory
chapters
on
the
development of
the
legislature,
electoral
administration
and
so
on,
as
well
as
a
number
of concluding
and
summarizing
chapters,
the
bulk
of
the
book
is
taken
up
with
accounts
of
twelve
individual
constituencies.
Consequently
although
there
is
some
repetition,
because
of
the
"case-study"
pattern
of
the
book,
more
severe editing
might
have
made
some
of
the
studies
incomplete.
Several
interesting
features
may
apply
in
other
developing
areas:
the
need
for
the
Administration
to
subsidize
candidates'
travel;
efforts
by
the
Admimstration
to
prevent
vote
splitting;
the
role
of
what
Thomas
Hodgkin,
in
Africa,
has
called
"party-generating
associations"
such
as
churches
and
co-operatives.
The
elections were
ostensibly
"national"
in
that
they
were
meant
to
be
an
important
step
on
the
road
to
independence.
They
were
in
fact
"local"
in
the
sense
that
there
were
no
nationalist
movements
or
party
organizations and
that
the
candidates' appeals
were
entirely
on
the
basis
of
prospective
local
benefits.
University
of
British
Columbia
R.
S.
MILNE

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