Book Review: Trade Practices and Consumer Protection

DOI10.1177/0067205X7901000108
AuthorG. de Q. Walker
Publication Date01 Mar 1979
SubjectBook Reviews
114 Federal
Law
Review
[VOLUME
10
The first
is
the question of recognition of Aboriginal customary law.
Rowley does not go into this question
at
length
but
does
make
some
limited suggestions
and
comparisons with
the
Papua
New Guinea
situation
at
pages 180-182.
He
is
probably
content
to permit the
discussion to rest with
Dr
Elizabeth Eggleston's analysis in Fear, Favour
or
Affection
(1976).'20
It
is
to be hoped
that
Dr
Rowley's deep insight
into these questions
may
be brought to
bear
by the Australian
Law
Reform
Commission in its reference
on
Aboriginal
Customary
Laws.21
Second, the most poignant writing in this
book
is reserved for
Chapter
9-The
Dark
Child's
Chance
of Justice. 1979
is
the
Inter-
national
Year
of the Child. Perhaps we should
ponder
this passage
at
page 202 during this year:
Imagine the effect
of
such arealisation (i.e.
that
dark
skin
is
a
badge of social inferiority)
on
the very
dark
child, boy
or
girl; and
there
is
no
further
need for explanation of the youthful alcoholics,
the prostitutes of school age, the early addiction to reckless and
hopeless defiance of authority, the
truancy
of the school child;
or
for
the despairing
parental
love and spoiling of the child while
he
is
still confident and unknowing, with
the
equally despairing
acceptance of
an
almost innocent youthful depravity when the
awareness which puberty brings
is
accompanied by realisation
that
one
is
for all one's life to be condemned.
DAVID
PARTLETT*
Trade Practices and Consumer Protection by G.
Q.
TAPERELL,
B.A.,
LL.B.
(Sydney),
LL.M.
(London),
Barrister of the Supreme
Court
of
New South Wales
and
R. B.
VERMEESCH,
LL.M.
(Sydney),
Senior
Lecturer
in Law, Australian
Graduate
School of Management, Solicitor
of
the Supreme
Court
of New South Wales
and
D. J.
HARLAND,
B.A.,
LL.B.
(Sydney),
B.C.L.
(Oxon),
Associate Professor of Law, University
of
Sydney, Solicitor
of
the Supreme
Court
of New South Wales.
(But-
terworths, 1978,
2nd
Edition),
pp. i-xxxiii, 1-732. Cloth, unpriced
(ISBN: 0409 38105
5),
Paperback, unpriced (ISB·N: 0409
38104
7).
This second edition
of
Taperell, Vermeesch and
Harland
is
over twice
the length
of
the first edition which appeared in 1974
and
has been
rewritten to aconsiderable extent.
It
will appeal both to practitioners
and to students, particularly those coming to the subject
for
the first
time. As before, it deals in one volume with restrictive
trade
practices
and mergers
(Trade
Practices
Act
1974,
Part
IV
(Cth))
and
consumer
protection
(Trade
Practices
Act
1974,
Part
V
(Cth)).
200p.
cit. 277-305.
21 Annual Report, 1978, The Law Reform Commission Australia, A.L.R.C. 10
paras. 74-78.
*LL.B. (Sydney), LL.M. (Virginia and -Michigan) ;Lecturer in Law, Australian
National University.

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