Collaborative case report: participatory action research into using EQUIP to support community discharge

Published date25 January 2020
Pages23-34
DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1108/JIDOB-05-2019-0010
Date25 January 2020
AuthorShaw Tearle,Sam S.,Rachel R. Holt
Collaborative case report: participatory
action research into using EQUIP to
support community discharge
Shaw Tearle, Sam S. and Rachel R. Holt
Abstract
Purpose There is a need to evaluate an adapted Equipping Youth to help One Another (EQUIP)
programme for people with intellectual disabilities and forensic needs. The purpose of this paper is to
explore a service user’s experience of completing the intervention as part of their transition into the
community.
Design/methodology/approach A collaborative case reportwas used. Following hospital discharge
and completion of the adaptedEQUIP programme, one service user with mild intellectual disabilitywas
supportedto share their treatment experiences usingparticipatory action research.
Findings Findings suggest that while the adapted community EQUIP group can support skills
acquisition (e.g. problem-solving), discharge processes and community reintegration, professionals
need to maintaina person-centred approach mindfulof participants’ complex emotionaljourneys.
Research limitations/implications The design allows for tentativeconclusions to be made about the
serviceuser’s journey and is not necessarily generalisable.
Practical implications There is a pressingneed to develop the evidence base for interventionsoffered
in the community to people with intellectual disabilities and a history of offending. This report provides
some evidencethat EQUIP can be adapted to support this population.
Originality/value This is the first coproduced publication exploring the experience of a service user
with intellectualdisability who completed an adaptedEQUIP programme.
Keywords Intellectual disability, Intervention, Community, Offending, Transition, EQUIP
Paper type Case study
Introduction
This article describes a collaborative case report between a health-care professional and
service user and adopts a participatory action research approach to enable them to
evaluate a specialist NHS communityforensic service using their lived experiences.
A review of existing literature indicates that most publications concerned with
community intellectual disability (ID) forensic teams concentrate on referral
characteristics and service functions (Lindsay et al., 2002). Although some publications
use case scenarios (Benton and Roy, 2008), evaluation focusing on service user
experience is limited.
Lowe (1992) suggested that individuals with ID are likely to be passive recipients of care
rather than contributors to service development. The extent to which people with ID are
given opportunities to participatein decision-making remained limited (Shogren et al., 2006.
The government launched a three-year strategy “Valuing People Now’’ (Department of
Health, 2009) to enhance specialistservices which actively listen to the views of people with
ID. Despite this, Hare et al. (2010) reportedthat services were still not listening to this group.
Shaw Tearle is based at the
Offending Behaviour
Intervention Service,
Hertfordshire Partnership
NHS Foundation Trust,
Hatfield, UK. Sam S. is
Expert by Experience in
UK. Rachel R. Holt is based
at the Offending Behaviour
Intervention Service,
Hertfordshire Partnership
NHS Foundation Trust,
Hatfield, UK.
Received 28 May 2019
Revised 23 December 2019
Accepted 23 December 2019
DOI 10.1108/JIDOB-05-2019-0010 VOL. 11 NO. 1 2020, pp. 23-34, ©Emerald Publishing Limited, ISSN 2050-8824 jJOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND OFFENDING BEHAVIOUR jPAGE 23

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