CORRIGENDUM

Publication Date01 Jan 1961
DOIhttp://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2230.1961.tb00663.x
208
THE
MODERN LAW REVIEW
VOL.
24
Commercial lawyers will look forward to the second volume. The present
volume naturally produces few problems of special interest to them. They
\vill however be attracted by the sections of the Code
of
Civil Procedure
rclating to the arrest of ships and to those sections of the registration law
relating to the transfer of property in ships. Contrary to English law, for
example, property in
a
seagoing ship passes by agreement, although property
in
chattels generally, including inland vessels,
also
requires actual
or
sym-
bolical transfer of the chattel. The reason for this extreme informality
is
obscure; that given by the authority referred to by the editor fails to con-
vince. Registration, necessary to establish the right to fly the
flag,
is
dcclaratory. This is one of the many points where the laws relating to sea-
going and inland vessels diverge, and the test of distinction between the two
types
of
vessel has given rise to intricate arguments recorded in this volume.
0.
C;
GIUS.
THE
BRITISH JOURNAL
OF
CRIMINOLOGY, Vol.
I,
No.
1,
July
1960.
[Published
for
the Institute
for
the Study and Treatment
of
Delinquency by Stevens
&
Sons, Ltd.
:
London. Quarterly.
12s.
6d.
Annual Subscription
S2
2s.I
JV1:
are
very glad to welcome the first number of the
old
BritMh
Journal
of
Delinquency,
under its new name. Since we noticed its first appearance in
1950 (14
M.L.R.
116)
it has pobe from strength to strength, and has inrlrccl
achieved an international reputation. The editors discuss in the opening
pages the reasons which have led to the change of name. The main one is that
while the word
delinquency’’ has come more and more to mean juvenile
offences the word
criminology
has been shedding its implication of being
principally concerned with
police science
which was always rather an
American use of the term. The decision is
a
wise one, and we hope that the
journal will continue to grow in authority and usefulness. Our own publishers,
Stevens and Sons, Limited, have now taken over the publishing of this journal.
In this number we have an authoritative article
by
the
senior psychologist
at Brixton Prison (Dr.
P.
de Berker) on “State of Mind” Reports for
sentencing tribunals, one of the more far-seeing innovations of the Criminal
Justice Act,
1948.
Dr. de Berker’s ‘opposite number at Wandsworth,
Mr.
R.
S.
Taylor, discusses the characteristics of the habitual criminal, and
Dr.
Pollock, the prison doctor at Portland, is in the unusual position of being ab!e
to provide a detailed history of
a
case of neurotic exhibitionism. At this
point the reader will begin to wonder whether the medical side is to fill the
whole number, but
Mr.
D.
M. Lowson who is something of
a
sociologist as well
as
Assistant Governor of
a
Borstal Institution comes to the rescue with
ti
wlrinble study of
Delinquency in Industrial Areas.”
As
usual
there is a Notes Section, this time devoted to overseas topics,
and the Current Survey on Research and Methodology
is
carried forward froin
the last number of the
British
Journnl
of
Delinquency.
C.
CORRIGENDITM
The writer
of
the letter published at
pp.
726-727
of
Vol.
23
of
the
Review
was
Mr.
Robert
A.
Samek, Senior Lecturer in Law in the
University
of
Melbourne.

To continue reading

Request your trial

VLEX uses login cookies to provide you with a better browsing experience. If you click on 'Accept' or continue browsing this site we consider that you accept our cookie policy. ACCEPT