DVLA warns drivers of 112 medical conditions they must declare or risk hefty fine

Publication Date10 November 2021
AuthorSophie Law
Publication titleGlasgowLive (Scotland)
If they fail to do so, they risk being fined up to £1,000 and potentially having their licence revoked.

The reminder comes after drivers were also warned that they legally need to see at least 20 metres in front of them by being able to read a licence plate. Failure to do so could result in an examiner failing the individual before their practical driving test even begins.

According to the agency website, there are 112 illnesses conditions and disabilities that the UK's Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency must be aware of ranging from eye issues to vertigo and even anxiety.

In an event where something happens, such as a car accident, and you did not declare one of the 112 illnesses or anything that may put you at risk whilst driving, the government states you, the individual, may be prosecuted as a result.

It's estimated there are around a million drivers on the road in the UK with a health issue they haven't flagged to the DVLA.

And whilst some conditions - such as head injuries and dementia - should be reported, other illness may not seem so obvious but do actually come with unexpected symptoms that could affect your ability to drive.

As a result, you are encouraged to always check with your doctor if you're unsure. However, the duty lies with the driver to inform the DVLA and not the doctor.

It's important to tell DVLA if you have a driving licence and the following:

* You develop a 'notifiable' medical condition or disability

* A condition or disability has got worse since you got your licence

Notifiable conditions are anything that could affect your ability to drive safely though if you are deaf you do not need to declare this to the DVLA.

Check if you need to declare your condition to find the forms or questionnaires you need. DVLA will assess your medical condition or disability and decide if:

* You need to get a new driving licence

* You can have a shorter licence - for one, two, three or five years

* You need to adapt your car by fitting special controls

* You must stop driving and give up your licence

Full list of medical conditions divers need to report to the DVLA

The following conditions must be declared to DVLA for driving a car or motorcycle:

Bus and lorry licences have different rules.

Agoraphobia

You must tell DVLA if agoraphobia affects your ability to drive safely.

Ask your doctor if you're not sure if your agoraphobia will affect your driving.

Alcohol problems

You must tell DVLA if you have an alcohol problem.

Alzheimer's disease

You must tell DVLA if you have Alzheimer's disease.

Amputations

You must tell DVLA if you've had a limb amputated.

Angiomas or cavernomas

A cavernoma is a cluster of abnormal blood vessels, usually found in the brain and spinal cord. They're sometimes known as cavernous angiomas.

You must tell DVLA if you have angiomas or cavernomas.

Ankylosing spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a long-term condition in which the spine and other areas of the body become inflamed.

You must tell DVLA if your ankylosing spondylitis affects your ability to drive safely.

Anorexia nervosa

You must tell DVLA if you have an eating disorder (for example anorexia nervosa) and it affects your ability to drive safely.

Ask your doctor if you're not sure if your eating disorder will affect your driving.

Anxiety

You must tell DVLA if you experience anxiety and it affects your ability to drive safely.

Ask your doctor if you're not sure if your anxiety will affect your driving.

Aortic aneurysm

You must tell DVLA if your aortic aneurysm is 6 centimetres or more in diameter despite treatment. You must not drive if your aortic aneurysm is 6.5 centimetres or more in diameter.

Ask your doctor or consultant if you're not sure.

Arachnoid cyst

Arachnoid cysts are the most common type of brain cyst.

You must tell DVLA if you have an arachnoid cyst.

Arrhythmia

You must tell DVLA about your arrhythmia if one of the following applies:

* You have distracting or disabling symptoms

* Your arrhythmia means you might not be able to safely stop or control a vehicle

Talk to your doctor if you're not sure if your arrhythmia causes other symptoms that will affect your driving, or if you must tell DVLA...

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