Foreign investment in papua new guineapolicies and practices P. Daniel and R. Sims National Centre for Development Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra, 1986, 144 pp.

AuthorRoman Grynberg
DOIhttp://doi.org/10.1002/pad.4230090212
Published date01 April 1989
Date01 April 1989
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT, VOL.
9,
237-244
(1989)
Book
Reviews
FOREIGN INVESTMENT
IN
PAPUA NEW GUINEA-POLICIES AND PRACTICES
P.
Daniel and R. Sims
National Centre for Development Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra,
1986,
144
pp.
This monograph looks in some detail at the factors hindering foreign investment in Papua
New Guinea (PNG) since independence. The work is largely descriptive and examines each
of
the major sectors in the economy in turn.
The main contribution
of
the work appears to be the documenting
of
the impediments to
investment, most notably the multiplicity
of
governments, both provincial and national, and
government agencies that give authority
to
foreign firms
to
invest. The authors have not
missed the other difficulties such as the acquisition
of
work permits as well as the purchase
of
land in a country where
97
per cent
of
land is traditionally owned. This last factor has acted
as a particularly important constraint on the development
of
agriculture and forestry
projects.
The sectoral analysis is for obvious reasons strongest in the field
of
gold and copper
mining, and drops
off
in detail when dealing with the other sectors such as plantations,
forestry and fisheries. Notably the work does consider the nation’s emerging petroleum
sector, which in the coming years will transform the PNG economy.
If there is a criticism it is that the work essentially fails even to consider the consequence
of
foreign investment in the creation
of
probably the classic case
of
a disarticulated export
enclave economy with little or no potential for sustained economic growth. Nevertheless the
work is an important contribution to the discussion on foreign investment in PNG, especially
in light of the nation’s shift in sectoral priority towards the development
of
agricultural
exports.
ROMAN
GRYNBERG
University
of
PNG,
Waigani
THE
DYNAMICS
OF
DEVELOPMENT AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
Kempe
Roland
Hope
Greenwood Press, London,
1984,
128
pp.
This book is banal, reminiscent
of
chapter two
of
masters dissertations in which the student
feels obliged to establish
a
conceptual framework, demonstrate a grasp
of
theory and prove
familiarity with the literature. The result, as is
so
often the case, is superficial, simplistic and
dull.
Hope has published widely in reputable journals and presumably knows the subject. Yet
this work is poor on several counts: three predominate. First, in places it is seriously
misleading. For example, Hope does not seem to have understood the objectives and thrust
of
the ‘development administration’ movement
of
the
1960s.
Many
of
us
were critical at the
time, and fashions have changed, but the movement was a powerful influence in its day and a
sincere attempt to break away from what was seen as the law-and-order administration
of
the
colonial period. It was not the same as ‘comparative administration’ either. A scholarly
analysis
of
the rise and fall
of
‘development administration’ seen from a
1980s
perspective
would be valuable. This collection
of
platitudes and half-truths is not. Second, the purpose is
obscure. The book claims to ‘analyse the evolutionary thought on the
two
concepts,
0
1989
by John Wiley
&
Sons, Ltd.

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