INTERNATIONAL STUDY CONFERENCE ON CLASSIFICATION FOR INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1108/eb026246
Publication Date01 Mar 1957
Pages152-155
AuthorBEATRICE WEBB HOUSE
SubjectInformation & knowledge management,Library & information science
INTERNATIONAL STUDY CONFERENCE ON
CLASSIFICATION FOR INFORMATION
RETRIEVAL
BEATRICE
WEBB HOUSE, DORKING, ENGLAND
13-17 May 1957
Conclusions and recommendations
WITHOUT
prejudice to the requirements of the other uses of classification,
the following conclusions and recommendations are made from the point
of view of information retrieval.
1.
The
scope
of classification
Traditional classification has been concerned with the construction of
hierarchies of terms—chains of classes and co-ordinated arrays. Modern
information retrieval techniques also necessitate the combination of terms
to express complex subjects. This conference takes the term 'classification'
to include the problems raised by both these forms of relation. Some
members use the term 'codification' for this field of study.
2.
Schemes
of classification
There is general agreement that the most helpful form of classification
scheme for information retrieval is one which groups terms into well-
defined categories, which can be used independently to form compounds,
and within which the terms can be arranged in hierarchies where this con-
forms to the recognized structure of relations between them.
3.
The need for
research
There is no single agreed technique for the construction of such schemes.
Facet analysis, relational analysis, codifying analysis, semantic analysis,
synthetic terminology, linguistic analysis, and other relevant techniques
should be further studied. There is a need for continued and organized
research into the theory of classification.
4.
The use of
classification schemes
Classification schemes constructed on the above lines may be applied in all
forms of literature search and information retrieval, ranging from manually
manipulated, visually scanned card catalogues on the one hand, to the most
highly developed machine systems on the other. Schemes can be adapted,
by suitable coding, to very different retrieval systems. Close co-operation
between those working on different retrieval systems is therefore valuable.
152

To continue reading

Request your trial

VLEX uses login cookies to provide you with a better browsing experience. If you click on 'Accept' or continue browsing this site we consider that you accept our cookie policy. ACCEPT