Pensions (Increase) Act

Publication Date01 Mar 1947
DOI10.1177/026455054700500815
SubjectArticles
111
NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
OF
MATERNITY
AND
CHILD
WELFARE
CENTRES
The
National
Association
of
Maternity
and
Child
Wel-
fare
Centres
and
for
the
Prevention
of
Infant
Mortality
held
an
all-day
Conference
at
Friends
House,
Euston
Road,
London,
on
January
30th,
1947,
to
discuss
the
question
of
the
teaching
of
Parentcraft
and
Homecraft,
as
set
out
in
the
Ministry
of
Education
Circular
117.
Between
four
and
five
hundred
delegates
and
repre-
sentatives
from
Public
Health
and
Education
Authorities,
County
and
Borough
Councils
and
Welfare
Societies
and
Associations,
including
N.A.P.O.,
were
present.
The
Chairman
of
the
morning
session
was
Miss
Myra
Curtis,
C.B.E.,
and
in
the
afternoon,
Sir
Wilson
Jameson,
K.C.B.,
M.D.,
F.R.C.P.,
Chief
Medical
Officers
of
the
Ministry
of
Health
and
the
Ministry
of
Education,
chaired
the
meeting.
Four
speakers,
each
of
whom
took
the
subjects
from
a
different
angle,
addressed
the
Conference.
The
two
most
outstanding
were
Dr.
Leslie
Housden,
O.B.E.,
who
spoke
on
&dquo;The
Need
and
Scope
of
Parentcraft,&dquo;
and
Dr.
John
Kershaw,
Medical
Officers
of
Health,
of
Colchester,
who
spoke
on
&dquo; The
Organisation
of
Parentcraft
and
Home-
craft
Teaching
on
a
National
Basis.&dquo;
Ample
time
was
given
’at
both
morning
and
afternoon
session
for
dis-
cussion,
and
some
very
interesting
contributions
were
made
to
the
Conference
from
the
floor
of
the
hall.
There
appeared
to
be
universal
agreement
that
it
would
be
most
desirable
for
all
young
people
of
both
sexes
to
have
the
benefit
of
compulsory
teaching
and
training
of
both
Parentcraft
and
Homecraft
at
some
stage
of their
scholastic
career.
At
present
it
will
be
rather
difficult
to
achieve
owing
to
a
lack
of
sufhcient
suitable
and
trained
teachers,
but
it
was
felt,
in
spite
of
this,
much
more
could
be
done
by
the
use
of
available
resources,
to
wit:
health
visitors,
etc.
PENSIONS
(INCREASE)
ACT
The
Pensions
(Increase)
Act,
1947,
provides
for
increases
in
the
limits
to,
and
the
rates
of,
pensions
increase
under
the
1944
Act,
and
provides
for
the
continuance
of
the
former
Act.
The
following
increases
now
become
operative:
Where
a
pensioner
is
married
or
has
at
least
one
dependant-
(a)
if
the
pension
does
not
exceed
£ 100
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
40
per
cent.
of
the
amount
of
the
pension;
(b)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£ 100
a
year
but
does
not
exceed
£ 143
6s.
8d.
a
year,
the
authorised
in-
crease
shall
be
the
amount
of
£40
a
year;
(c)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£ 133
6s.
8d.
a
year
but
does
not
exceed
£ 200
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
30
per
cent.
of
the
amount
of
the
pension;
(d)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£200
a
year
but
does
not
exceed
£390
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
the
amount
which
is
necessary
to
increase
the
pension
to
£ 450
a
year.
Where
a
pensioner
is
unmarried
and
has
no
dependants-
(a)
if
the
pension
does
not
exceed
£75
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
40
per
cent.
of
the
amount
of
the
pension;
(b)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£75
a
year
but
does
not
exceed
£ 100
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
the
amount
of
£ 30
a
year;
(c)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£ 100
a
year
but
does
not
exceed
£ 150
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
30
per
cent.
of
the
amount
of
the
pension;
(d)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£ 150
a
year
but
does
not
exceed
£ 305
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
the
amount
of
£45
a
year;
(e)
if
the
pension
exceeds
£305
a
year,
the
authorised
increase
shall
be
the
amount
which
is
necessary
to
increase
the
pension
to
£ 350
a
year.
BOOK
REVIEW
The
Juvenile
Courts—Their
Work
and
Problems,
by
F.
T.
Giles.
Published
by
Allen
&
Unwin,
6s.
.
Mr.
Giles
is
both
topical
and
stimulating
in
his
treat-
ment
of
that
hardy
annual,
&dquo; the
Problem
of
Juvenile
Delinquency,&dquo;
and
his
informed
views
should
provide
a
valuable
antidote
to
the
pessimistic
fulminations
which
issue
with
distressing
regularity
from
Press
and
platform.
This
book
gives
a
balanced
picture
of
the
Juvenile
Court
as
it
is
to-day;
explains
its
powers
and
the
safeguards
against
the
abuse
of
those
powers;
and
indicates
briefly
the
complexity-as
opposed
to
the
magnitude-of
some
of
the
problems
which
the
courts
have
to
attempt
to
solve.
There
is
a
good
word
for
the
psychiatrist
and
a
salutary
Chapter
on
the
use
of
statistics
as
the
sole
criterion
of
success
or
failure.
With
all
this,
the
reader
is
not
irritated
by
any
suggestion
of
undue
complacency,
indeed,
the
most
interesting
chapter
is
called &dquo;
The
Future.&dquo;
&dquo;For
the
future
of
the
juvenile
courts,
everyone
has
a
plan.
Un-
fortunately,
all
the
plans
are
different.&dquo;
So
says
the
author,
and
then
goes
on
to
show
that
he
is
the
exception
that
proves
the
rule,
since
he
has
no
sovereign
remedy
to
offer.
All
the
same,
he has
some
very
pertinent
observa-
tions
on
the
more
extreme
proposals
that
have
been
mooted
in
recent
years
and
some
practical
suggestions
for
improving
the
courts
within
their
present
framework.
(Continued
from
page
109)
He
feels
that
it
is
these
families
who
are
the
breeding
grounds
for
juvenile
delinquency,
crime
and
all
the
social
diseases
such
as
venereal
disease
and
vermin,
etc.,
and
anti-social
behaviour
in
general.
Greater
interest
was
shown
in
this
discussion
than
in
any
other
item.

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