Review: Road Traffic Prosecutions

Publication Date01 July 1954
DOI10.1177/002201835401800312
SubjectReview
REVIEWS 295
to more
than
one crime."
The
work is more
than
are-statement of such
principles ; it is aclosely argued, critical study of the history and development
of the principles, astudy in which the learned author does not hesitate
where necessary to differ from judicial decisions, pointing adissentient
finger at the spot where principle has been abandoned or distorted.
The
major
part of this large book is concerned with that most important thing in criminal
law-the
mental element in crime. Rarely has the doctrine of mens
Tea
been so searchingly examined or so critically discussed and in support of
his arguments, or by way of illustrating them, the learned author calls on
judicial decisions from courts in all parts of the world.
There
are also chapters
on attempts, conspiracy, corporations and other matters covering the whole
field of criminal law.
Professor Williams promises us a complementary volume in the future
dealing with specific crimes.
The
high quality of the present volume indicates
that
the completed work will provide one of the most authoritative treatises
on English criminal law that has ever appeared.
ROAD TRAFFIC PROSECUTIONS. By G. S. Wilkinson, Solicitor, Clerk to the
Dudley Justices. Solicitors' Law Stationery Society,
Ltd.
Price 25s.
The
Criminal Statistics for 1952 show that in that year 398,075 persons
were found guilty of traffic offences, i.e. 53.3 per cent of offences of all kinds.
Further, the trend of the past three years indicates that the total in 1953 will
comfortably exceed 400,000.
The
need, therefore, for a book devoted to
road traffic prosecutions is more evident today
than
ever before. Mr. Wilkin-
son has, in this book, done a good
job
of work.
With
commendable patience
he has collected notes of cases from law reports, journals
and
newspapers,
so that the reader has a mine of precedent from which to draw.
This
is an
eminently "practical" book dealing with every aspect of motoring law.
It
will be invaluable to practitioners
and
many a justices' clerk will have it
beside him in court.
Mr. Wilkinson has posed a timely question when he considers the case
of the driver who takes too much to drink, not intending to go near his car
until he is sober again. Is he in charge of the car
if
it is outside his hotel
on the road or in a car
park?
Is he to be allowed no locus poenitentice ?
Achapter devoted to "special reasons" is of special value, and there is
much useful information in
that
on appeals. Despite one or two minor
inaccuracies this book is good value for money and deserves success.
STONE'S JUSTICES' MANUAL FOR 1954. Eighty-sixth Edition, edited by James
Whiteside
and
J. P. Wilson. Butterworth &Co.
Ltd.
£3 17s. 6d. (or on thin
paper
£4
2S.
6d.).
A new edition of
"Stone"
is always something of an event, and to this
new two-volume edition, which runs to 2,959 pages without the Table of
Statutes and Cases, 328 pp., and Index, 219 pp., magistrates
and
their clerks
may
tum
for guidance on every aspect of the criminal law of England.
The
editors have done their work well.
"This
edition" (we quote from the Preface)
"brings up to date all the law that falls within the wide scope of magisterial

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