A STUDY OF HIGHER ORDER NEED STRENGTH AND JOB SATISFACTION IN SECONDARY PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS

DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1108/eb009860
Date01 February 1982
Publication Date01 February 1982
Pages172-183
AuthorMARGARET C. PASTOR,DAVID A. ERLANDSON
SubjectEducation
THE
JOURNAL
OF
EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
VOLUME XX, NUMBER 2 SUMMER 1982
A STUDY OF HIGHER ORDER NEED STRENGTH AND JOB
SATISFACTION IN SECONDARY PUBLIC SCHOOL
TEACHERS
MARGARET C. PASTOR
AND
DAVID A. ERLANDSON
It was the purpose of this study to identify areas of teacher motivation by determining
teacher needs and their relationship to job satisfaction. This objective was pursued
by applying the concept of higher and lower order need strength to secondary public
school teachers. This concept was first developed and applied in business
administration as a means of measuring worker motivation. It is based on the
assumption that a match between the needs experienced by the individual and the
needs fulfilled by the job bring greater job satisfaction and thus an increase in job
productivity. While a predominance of higher order needs in secondary school
teachers was found, the correlation of need strength and job satisfaction varied by
school district. Apparently teaching in some schools is more satisfying to teachers
with lower order needs while teaching in other schools is more satisfying to teachers
with higher order needs.
The importance of motivation in education is not a new concept. Much
time and effort have been devoted to analyzing the amount and kind of
motivation that a child needs in order to learn. However, very little has
been done to determine what motivates the teacher. The two areas of
motivation are not unrelated. Sergiovanni1 emphasizes the role that the
attitude and drive of the teacher plays in the fulfillment of student needs. It
is therefore appropriate that the needs of the teacher be examined, not
only from the standpoint of effective administration, but also because of
their direct effect on the learning environment of the classroom.
The principles of motivation have been primary concerns in the field of
business administration and management ever since the realization that
employee motivation has a bearing on productivity. These studies began
around 1936, and some of the most recent work has been on the
relationship between job design and motivation. The intention of this
recent work has been to create a match between employee and task in
order to maximize production. It was the purpose of the present study to
apply some of the insights gained in industrial studies to teacher
motivation.
MARGARET C. PASTOR is a research consultant presently located in Cali, Columbia. She
holds the degrees of B.S. and M.S. (Eastern Illinois) and Ph.D. (Texas A&M). DAVID A.
ERLANDSON is Associate Professor at Texas A&M University in the Department of
Educational Administration and holds the degrees of B.A. (Wheaton), M.S. (Northern
Illinois) and Ed.D. (Illinois).

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