The National Assembly for Wales and the Promotion of Sustainable Development: Implications for collaborative government and governance

Date01 April 1999
DOI10.1177/095207679901400206
Published date01 April 1999
The
National
Assembly
for
Wales
and
the
Promotion
of
Sustainable
Development:
Implications
for
collaborative
government
and
governance
Kevin
Bishop
and
Andrew
Flynn
Department
of
City
and
Regional
Planning,
Cardiff
University
Abstract
The
National
Assembly
for
Wales
is
unique
amongst
all
levels
of
modern
government
in
the
UK
in
that
it
is
legally
required
under
section
121(1)
of
the
Government
of
Wales
Act
1998
to
make
a
scheme
setting
out
how
it
proposes,
in
the
exercise
of
its
functions,
to
promote
sustainable
development.
This
requirement
represents
a
significant
challenge
for
the
Assembly
in
terms
of
establishing
institutional
structures
and
operational
processes
that
will
facilitate
and
promote
sustainable
development
across
all
of
its
areas
of
responsibility.
This
article
explores
the
background
to
the
duty
placed
upon
the
Assembly
and
the
different
models
that
the
Assembly
may
pursue
in
trying
to
achieve
its
goal
of
sustainable
development.
It
explores
the
potential
for
joined-up
government
within
the
Assembly
and
the
prospects
for
new
forms
of
governance
in
its
external
links
and
the
interactions
between
its
internal
and
external
processes.
The
article
concludes
that
the
Assembly
will
be
a
powerful
force
for
collabo-
rative
government
and
that
the
requirements
of
section
121
should
reinforce
this
move
towards
a
new
style
of
collaborative
government
but
that
there
remains
a
risk
that
pragmatic
pressures
may
prompt
a
return
to
the
traditionally
dominant
form
of
economic
governance
that
characterised
the
former
Welsh
Office.
Introduction
The
environment
has
long
been
seen
as
raising
a
number
of
challenges
for
the
management
of
government
and
for
the
relationship
of
government
with
external
organisations.
Over
time
understanding
of
the
environment
has
broadened
from
that
of
a
physical
asset
or
a
resource
to
one
that
encompasses
such
diverse
topics
as
human
and
animal
health,
trade,
community
well-being,
climate
change
and
so
on.
Such
diversity
has
almost
inevitably
meant
that
the
environment
has
been
difficult
to
contain
within
the
functional
division
of
government
responsibilities.
Public
Policy
and
Administration
Volume
14
No.
2
Summer
1999
62

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