The top five – globalization and the law – predictions for the first half of the twenty‐first century

Pages398-401
DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1108/03055720810917651
Date24 October 2008
Publication Date24 October 2008
AuthorCynthia M. Gayton
SubjectInformation & knowledge management
LEGAL ASPECTS OF KNOWLEDGE
MANAGEMENT
The top five globalization and
the law predictions for the first
half of the twenty-first century
Cynthia M. Gayton
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,
The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA
Abstract
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to outline what the author believes will be the top five legal
issues relating to globalization and business for the first 50 years of the twenty-first century.
Design/methodology/approach – This is a wrap-up paper articulating the author’s opinion about
what she considers to be the top five legal issues that will be face in the first half of the twenty-first
century.
Findings – The paper reveals cooperative censorship; intellectual property treaty harmonization
domination by developing country interpretations; international tribunal dispute resolution clauses;
return of the law merchant; and eminent domain or public utility – the future for dominant search
engines/content aggregators as the possible top five legal issues pertaining to businesses and
globalization.
Originality/value – The paper presents an interesting prediction of the top five legal issues relating
to globalization and business for the first 50 years of the twenty-first century.
Keywords Globalization,Law, Intellectual property, Censorship, Search engines
Paper type Viewpoint
These top five legal issues pertaining to businesses and globalization are obviously
subjective and, therefore, have no authoritative basis other than my own opinion.
Following is an outline of what I believe will be the top five legal issues for the first 50
years of the twenty-first century:
(1) cooperative censorship;
(2) intellectual property treaty harmonization domination by developing country
interpretations;
(3) international tribunal dispute resolution clauses;
(4) return of the law merchant; and
(5) eminent domain or public utility – the future for dominant search
engines/content aggregators.
Cooperative censorship
By “cooperative censorship,” I mean that business and governments will work together
to limit knowledge available to the public. There is significant evidence of this trend.
Some existing search engines and web sites have cooperated with governments to
The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at
www.emeraldinsight.com/0305-5728.htm
VINE
38,4
398
VINE: The journal of information and
knowledge management systems
Vol. 38 No. 4, 2008
pp. 398-401
qEmerald Group Publishing Limited
0305-5728
DOI 10.1108/03055720810917651

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