Training for integrated rural development Joseph Mullen University of Manchester, 1986, 83 pp.

Date01 January 1989
Published date01 January 1989
DOIhttp://doi.org/10.1002/pad.4230090111
AuthorD. C. Newman
116
Book
reviews
and (one might add) sectoral or enterprise? Should regulatory mechanisms be binding or
voluntary? What are the ingredients of organizations that can effectively undertake the
above, at whatever level and
in
whatever format? A useful starting point, at least at a global
level, would be a detailed case study of why exactly the UN-sponsored Code
of
Conduct
on
Transnational Corporations has
so
far not got off the ground.
PAUL D. COLLINS
New York
TRAINING FOR INTEGRATED RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Joseph
Mullen
University
of
Manchester, 1986,
83
pp.
Joseph Mullen’s diagnosis and recommended treatment of the problems of rural areas in
Third World countries differs from others primarily in its emphasis
on
the development of
people rather than products. He sets himself the ambitious objective
of
prescribing a system
which will strengthen the productivity, health and well-being of rural populations despite a
reduction in external investment.
It is hardly surprising if that objective is not completely achieved. World food markets no
longer offer a basis for the creation
of
national wealth through agriculture alone and, without
other sources
of
capital, improvements to the infrastructure pose serious challenge.
Throughout the handbook Dr Mullen teases out the relationship between the providers of
development funds, with their technical and administrative know-how, and the recipient
peoples whose perceptions
of
the problems and proper solutions are
so
often different. True,
they come together, as would be expected, in their views
on
the need for the basic necessities
of
life-potable water, food and shelter. Beyond that Dr Mullen’s recommendations on
communication networks, education, health and communal meeting facilities are sensibly
qualified by his knowledge of the physical, social and economic barriers which impede the
progress of their development.
A number of positive recommendations nevertheless emerge, particularly in the field
of
education where a greater emphasis is called for at secondary and tertiary levels on subjects,
disciplines and skills more closely related to economic development and potential. It must
come as little comfort to developing countries that almost identical comments are still being
made about the educational system in Great Britain.
Sections on decentralization
of
power and authority, and on participation
of
the
population at large
in
the planning and implementation
of
social and economic policy, make
compelling reading, but cannot quite avoid the criticism that they are long on analysis but
short on solutions. Few attempts to deal with such a large subject
in
so
few pages can expect
to
avoid that criticism altogether, however, and the case-study illustrations certainly confirm
that Dr Mullen is no mere theorist. His well-presented handbook demonstrates convincingly
the vital contribution which well-designed training can make to rural development
in
many
of the poorer countries of the world.
D. C. NEWMAN
Director, Agricultural Training Board
THE
END OF THE THIRD WORLD: NEWLY INDUSTRIALIZING COUNTRIES
AND THE DECLINE OF AN
IDEOLOGY.
Nigel
Harris
I. B. Tauris, London, 1986,
231
pp.
One
of
the most powerful ideas in contemporary social science is that of the ‘three worlds’ of
development: a First World of capitalist states, a Second World of communist states and a
Third World
of
underdeveloped or developing countries. This book is about the idea
of
the
Third World, the social-science theories that arose from the idea, and the author’s view that
the idea has lost most
of
its validity.
The major claim is that the idea
of
three groups of countries made some sense when world
trade was characterized by the relatively straightforward exchange
of
raw materials for

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