Book Review: A Short History of International Affairs, 1920–1939

Publication Date01 September 1951
AuthorF. H. Soward
DOI10.1177/002070205100600318
Date01 September 1951
SubjectBook Review
252
INTERNATIONAL
JOURNAL
administrative
methods
of
the communists,
some
powerful
Chinese
groups
outside
China are
abating
their
interest
in
the
Red Government
and
looking
towards Formosa.
He
noted
last
year
that
in
Malaya
"there
was
a
growing
hostility
towards
the
Mao
Tse-tung
rigime."
Victoria, May
1951.
Robert
Holland
A
SHORT
HISTORY
OF
INTERNATIONAL
AFFAIRS,
1920-1939.
By
G.
M.
Gathorne-Hardy.
Fourth
Edition,
1950.
(London,
Toronto:
Oxford.
ix,
540
pp.
$3.75,
members
$3.00.)
The
fourth
edition
of
this
well-known
survey
of
international
affairs
will
be
as
welcome
as
its predecessors.
The
author
has expanded
his
opening
section,
added
a
suggestive
epilogue
on
the
causes
of
failure
during the
twenty
years,
and
revised
his
factual
material
in
the
light
of
the
flood
of
books
on
the
period.
Occasionally
he
has
not
made
full
use
of
new
material,
as
in
his
description
of
Mr.
Eden's
resignation
in
which
he
ignores
the information
contained
in
the
Ciano
Papers,
or
in
the
account
of
the
last
weeks
of
peace
in
which
the
inept handling
of
British
policy escapes
the rough criticism
which
it
has
received
from
Professor
Namier.
In
the light
of
our
present
troubles the
book
appears
much
too limited
in
its
treatment
of
both
American
and
Soviet
policy.
On
the other hand
it
is
one
of
the
few
such
surveys
which makes
some
attempt to
describe
developments
in
the
Middle
East
and
the
Islamic
world.
For
helpful
organization,
economy
of
narrative
and clarity
of
style
this
survey
will
not
soon
be
surpassed.
University
of
British
Columbia,
May
1951.
F.
H.
Soward
THE
YEAR
BOOK
OF
WORLD
AFFAIRS,
1951.
Volume
5.
Published
under
the
auspices
of
the London
Institute
of
World
Affairs.
1950.
(Lon-
don:
Stevens
and
Sons
Limited.
ix,
428
pp.
30s.)
Once
again
the London
Institute
of
World
Affairs
has provided
us
with a
lively
miscellany
of
articles
by
experts.
Pride
of
place
in
the
Year
Book goes
to
Sir
Alexander
Cadogan's
terse
and
suggestive
comment
on
"The
United
Nations:
A
Balance
Sheet."
It
deserves
to
be
read with
Professor
Brierly's
essay
"The
Covenant and
the
Charter"
as
samples
of
how much
that
is
fresh
and
pertinent
can
be
said
in
small
compass
by
men
with
first
class
minds.
Among
the
remaining
essays
Miss
Susan
Strange
again
demonstrates
her
capacity
for
clear
and
lively
comment
on
economic
questions
in
her
excellent
essay
on
"The
Schuman
Plan."
For
this
particular
volume
the
country
selected
for
treatment
is
Turkey,
and
Dr.
J.
Daniel
does
a
competent
job
of
describing
Turkey's
position
in
the
post-war
world.
The
editors
have
rather
heavily
weighted
the
collection
with
legal

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