Correction

Date01 June 1967
DOI10.1177/002070206702200245
Published date01 June 1967
356
INTERNATIONAL
JOURNAL
materials
in
the
possession
of
the
Foreign
Office
as
well
as
on
interviews
with
a
number
of
Italian
diplomats.
Time
and
the mass
of
publications
since
have not
shaken
her
original
structure.
She
has
now
tried
to
alter
it
in
detail
by
including
this
recent
evidence-notably
the diary
of
Leonardo
Simomn-to
fill
out
her
story.
Her
research
has
by
no
means
been
exhaustive,
as
the
references
here
show,
but
she
has
usefully
brought
older
documentation
up
to
date.
Her
study
remains
a
com-
pelling account
of
the
two
dictators
and
their
frigid friendship, replete
with
their
own
words
and
those
of
their
mutually
suspicious
servants.
It
is
still
one
of
the best
books
on
the
Hitler
era.
[JOHN
C.
CAIRNS]
THE
LAST
BATTLE.
By
Cornelius
Ryan.
1966.
(New
York:
Simon
Schuster.
Toronto:
Musson.
571pp.
$8.50)
While
a
professional
historian
may
be
inclined to
sneer
at
this
Book-of-the-Month-Club
type
of
history
he
might more
logically
sigh
with
envy
at
the
royalties
it
is
undoubtedly (and deservedly)
earning,
or
covet
the "vast
research
resources"
of
the
Reader's Digest
and
the
two
thousand
men
and
women who
contributed
to
it.
Among
The
Last
Battle's
chief weaknesses
are
over-writing
and
a
lack
of
discrimination
which
assigns
almost
as
much
space
to
milkman
Richard
Poganowska's
travels
through
the
streets
of
Dahlem
and Wilmersdorf
as
to
Stalin's
conference
outlining
the
projected
attack
on
Berlin.
But
besides
taking
full,
perhaps
too
full, advantage
of
the
dramatic
qualities
of
the
epic
final
struggle
for
the
capital
of
the Third
Reich,
Ryan
has
made
two
important
contributions.
Thanks
to
the
collaboration
of
Professor
John
Erickson
of
the
University
of
Manchester,
he
was
able
to
penetrate
Soviet
military
files
and
to
interview
the
major
Red
Army
leaders
(apart
from
Zhukov),
and
so
to
bring
a
new
dimension
to
a
tale
which
has
frequently
been
told
from British,
American,
and German
sources.
And
he
has
made
extensive
use
of
the
memoirs and
recollections
of
an
almost
forgotten
German,
Colonel
General
Gotthard
Heinrich,
the
com-
mander
of
Army
Group
Vistula.
[ROBERT
SPENCER]
Correction
In
L.
C.
Green's
article
"South
West
Africa
and
the World
Court"
(Vol.
XXII,
No.
1,
Winter
1966-67),
the
footnote
reference
to
the
con-
troversy
over
Judge
Khan
was omitted.
To
the
first
sentence,
p.
59,
reading
"Zafrulla
Khan had,
however,
also
been
nominated
at
one
time
as
the
Ethiopian/Liberian
judge
ad
hoc"
there
should
have
been
appended
as
a
footnote:
Rosalyn Higgins,
"The
International
Court
and
South
West Africa"
44
International
Affairs,
1966,
pp.
586-7.
The
Editors
regret
this
omission, which occurred
through
editorial
error.

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