Foreign Policy for Australia and New Zealand

Date01 September 1951
Published date01 September 1951
DOI10.1177/002070205100600305
FOREIGN
POLICY
FOR
AUSTRALIA
AND
NEW
ZEALAND
J. F.
Northey
*
T
IS
COMMONLY
SUPPOSED
that
the
policies
of
Australia
and
New
Zealand
on
questions
of
external
affairs
are
similar,
if
not
identical.
Certainly
their
geographic
position
in
the South
Pacific,
their
mem-
bership
in the
Commonwealth,
their
partnership
in
the
Canberra
(also
known as
the
ANZAC) Pact,
and
their
traditions
all
have
the
effect
of
making
their
outlook
on
foreign
affairs
similar,
but
an
assumption
that
their
policies
are
identical
is
no
more
justified
that
is
a
belief
that
the
same
policies
are
pursued
by
the
United
States
and
Canada.
However,
on
the
major
issues
now facing
countries
in
the
Pacific-and
this article
can
attempt
to
cover
only
the
more
important
questions-there
is
sufficient
basic
agreement
between
Australia
and
New
Zealand
to
permit
their
policies
to
be
treated together. The
New
Zealand
Minister
of
External
Affairs
has
properly
asserted
that
Australia's
security
is
essential
to
New
Zealand
and
Australia
necessarily
has
a
similar interest
in
the security
of
New
Zealand.
Australia
could
not
look
with
equanimity
on
a
hostile occupation
of
New Zealand.
The
common
concern
of
Australia and
New
Zealand
in
all
questions
affecting
the
South West
and South
Pacific
regions
was
given
express recognition in
the
Canberra
Pact
which
declared
the
need
for
establishing
a
zone
of
defence
stretching
through
the
arc
of
islands
north
and
north-east
of
Australia to
Western
Samoa
and
the
Cook
Islands.
The Australian
and New Zealand
Labour
Administrations
in
office
during
and
since
the
Second
World
War
were
defeated
in December
1949
respectively
by a
coalition
of
the Liberal
and
Country
Parties
and
the
National
Party.
These
new
governments
have
not
altered
basic
policies,
but
there
have
been
changes
in
emphasis.
Whereas
support
of
the
United Nations
was given
pride
of
place
by
the
Labour
Govern-
ments,
the
new
governments,
while
asserting
and
demonstrating
their
continued
belief
in
the purposes
and
principles
of
the
United Nations,
have
put
co-operation
within
the
Commonwealth,
and
especially
with
the
Asian
Dominions,
in
the
forefront
and
have
also
declared
their
desire
to
establish
special
ties
with the
United
States.
The
recent
appointment
of
Mr.
Spender,
formerly
Australian
Minister
of
External
Affairs,
as
Ambassador
to
the
United States,
and the
visits
of
the New
Zealand
Prime
Minister and
Minister
of
External
Affairs
to
the
United
*A
second
article
on
problems of this
area
by
Dr.
Northey,
of
Auckland
University.

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