Mission: Control?

AuthorJohn Goslin
Publication Date01 June 1975
DOI10.1177/026455057502200208
SubjectArticles
55
and
so
on.
In
conclusion
I
have
regarded
the
learning
of
communica-
tion
skills
as
a
continuous
process
in
staff
development
and
have
argued
that
it
is
a
desirable
thing
to
do
because
communication
is
central
in
a
range
of
activities
including
social
work,
administration
and
teaching.
I
have
briefly
reviewed
some
of the
resources
available
for
learning
although
we
are
not
sufhciently
clear
about
the
nature
of
the
skills
involved
and
therefore
learning
objectives
are
not
always
explicit.
The
main
concern
in
this
article
has
been
with
communication
between
probationer
and
probation
officers.
The
role
of
communication
skills
in
administration
requires
further
study
although
the
learning
methods
described
here
have
been
found
helpful
in
that
context
too.
.
REFERENCES
1.
C.
Fishwick:
"Expansion
in
Horizons:
Some
Implications
for
Train.
ing."
Probation
Journal,
Vol.
21,
No. 2,
June
1974.
2.
R.
Carkhuff:
Helping
and
Human
Relations.
Holt,
Rinehart
and
Winston,
1969.
3.
P.
R.
Day:
Communication
in
Social
Work.
Pergamon
Press,
1972.
4.
M.
Valk:
"Learning
to
feel
the
client’s
predicament."
Social
Work
Today,
4th
May
1973.
5.
C.
Cooper
and
I.
Mangham:
T.
Groups:
A
Survey
of
Research.
Wiley,
1971.
6.
For
example,
W.
J.
Reid:
"Characteristics
of
casework
intervention."
Welfare in
Review,
5,
1967.
7.
E.
J.
Mullen:
"Casework
communication."
Social
Casework,
49,
1968.
8.
D.
Allen
and
K.
Ryan:
Microteaching.
Addison
Wesley,
1969.
Mission:
Control?
JOHN
GOSLIN
Dorset
THE
probation
officer,
once
a
&dquo;missionary&dquo;
is
now
to
be
called
a
&dquo;controller&dquo;,
it
seems.
Recently
Mr
Brayshaw
of
the
Magistrates’
Association
used
the
phrase
on
radio,
in
relation
to
the
release
of
offenders
from
custody,
&dquo;into
control&dquo;,
rather
than
&dquo;under
supervision&dquo;.
Let
us
focus
our
attention
upon
two
things
only:
the
meanings
of
&dquo;control&dquo;
and
&dquo;responsibility&dquo;.
In
all
the
discussion
of
Younger,
the
point
is
often
made
that
proba-
tion
officers
are
used
to
controlling
as
well
as
caring,
and
this
is
nothing
new.
This
was
my
own
view, indeed;
but
I
have
now
modified
it
some-
what
on
thinking
through
what
is
meant.
So
far
the
element
of
control
has
been
very
largely
in
one
area-the
maintenance
of
contact
between

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