Review: International Economics: Canadian Agriculture in a Global Context

Publication Date01 Dec 1986
DOI10.1177/002070208604100418
AuthorJohn S. Brierley
SubjectReview
REVIEWS
/
INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
901
contains
much
historical
and
current
data and
estimates
presented
in
diagrams
and
tables,
is
sprinkled
with
'boxes'
that
present
long
foot-
notes
on
specific
points
and
is
followed
by
technical
notes.
H.C.
Eastman/University
of
Toronto
CANADIAN
AGRICULTURE
IN
A
GLOBAL
CONTEXT
Opportunities
and
obligations
Edited
by
Irene
Sage
Knell
and
John
R.
English
Waterloo:
University
of
Waterloo
Press,
1986,
xvi,
229pp,
$17.50
This
illuminating
collection
of
essays
appears
in
a
year
when
news
about Canadian
agriculture
seems
to
be
increasingly
pessimistic.
The
book,
the
first
of
two
volumes
emanating
from
a
1985
conference
sponsored
by
the
Centre
on
Foreign
Policy
and
Federalism
at
the
University
of
Waterloo
and
Wilfrid
Laurier
University,
provides
a
much
needed
muiltifaceted
approach
to
Canadian
agriculture.
Twelve
articles
are
presented
by
scholars
representing
a
diversity
of
disciplines
and
experiences, including agricultural
economics,
economics,
his-
tory,
political science,
resource management,
the
federal
civil
service,
the
United
Nations,
and
academia.
Organized
into
four
sections,
the
book
first
examines the
contem-
porary
world
food
situation and
details
the
nature
and
level
of
Can-
ada's
contribution.
It then
reviews
the
likelihood
that
Canada
will
be
able
to
increase
its
farm
production
and
export
markets.
Consider-
ation
is
given
to
the
possible
ecological
constraints
on
such
increases
and
to
the
political issues
associated
with
securing
and/or
maintaining
overseas
markets.
The
third
section
reviews
the prospects
for
growth
in
established
Canadian foreign
markets,
namely
China,
Japan,
East-
ern
Europe,
the
Soviet
Union,
and
the
Third
World,
in
light
of
recent
agrarian
and
economic
developments,
as
well
as
in
the
face
of'
ag-
gressive
American
competition.
Finally,
some
thoughts
are
expressed
regarding
Canada's
role
in
the
global
food
system.
These
articles
reveal
the
immense challenge
that
confronts
Ca-
nadian
agriculture
if
it
is
to
maintain
its
national
and
international
status.
Although
the
future
is
deemed
unpredictable,
the
authors

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