Breach of Statutory Duty in UK Law

Leading Cases
  • Anns v Merton London Borough Council
    • House of Lords
    • 12 May 1977

    First one has to ask whether, as between the alleged wrongdoer and the person who has suffered damage there is a sufficient relationship of proximity or neighbourhood such that, in the reasonable contemplation of the former, carelessness on his part may be likely to cause damage to the latter—in which case a prima facie duty of care arises.

  • Anns v Merton London Borough Council
    • House of Lords
    • 12 May 1977

    In my opinion they may also include damage to the dwelling-house itself; for the whole purpose of the byelaws in requiring foundations to be of certain standard is to prevent damage arising from weakness of the foundations which is certain to endanger the health or safety of occupants.

  • Stovin and Another v Norfolk County Council
    • House of Lords
    • 24 Jul 1996

    It will often be foreseeable that loss will result if, for example, a benefit or service is not provided. If the policy of the act is not to create a statutory liability to pay compensation, the same policy should ordinarily exclude the existence of a common law duty of care.

  • Bonnington Castings Ltd v Wardlaw
    • House of Lords
    • 01 Mar 1956

    In my judgment, the employee must in all cases prove his case by the ordinary standard of proof in civil actions: he must make it appear at least that on a balance of probabilities the breach of duty caused or materially contributed to his injury.

  • R (Bernard and Another) v Enfield Borough Council
    • Queen's Bench Division (Administrative Court)
    • 25 Oct 2002

    Positive measures have to be taken (by way of community care facilities) to enable them to enjoy, so far as possible, a normal private and family life. Whether the breach of statutory duty has also resulted in an infringement of the claimants' Article 8 rights will depend upon all the circumstances of the case. Just what was the effect of the breach in practical terms on the claimants' family and private life?

  • Dorset Yacht Company Ltd v Home Office
    • House of Lords
    • 06 May 1970

    Donoghue v. Stevenson [1932] A.C. 562 may be regarded as a milestone, and the well-known passage in Lord Atkin's speech should I think be regarded as a statement of principle. It is not to be treated as if it were a statutory definition. But I think that the time has come when we can and should say that it ought to apply unless there is some justification or valid explanation for its exclusion.

  • Lochgelly Iron and Coal Company v McMullan
    • House of Lords
    • 10 Jul 1933

    In strict legal analysis, negligence means more than heedless or careless conduct, whether in omission or commission: it properly connotes the complex concept of duty, breach, and damage thereby suffered by the person to whom the duty was owing: on all this the liability depends and if this liability is attached by law formally to the employer, as happens in the case of a breach of the statutory duty, the whole position is I apprehend correctly described as "personal negligence of the employer."

See all results
Books & Journal Articles
See all results
Law Firm Commentaries
See all results