Practice and Procedure in UK Law

Leading Cases
  • Denton and Others v Th White Ltd and Another; Decadent Vapours Ltd v Bevan and Others; Utilise Tds Ltd v Cranstoun Davies and Others
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 04 July 2014

    A judge should address an application for relief from sanctions in three stages. If the breach is neither serious nor significant, the court is unlikely to need to spend much time on the second and third stages. We recognise that hard-pressed first instance judges need a clear exposition of how the provisions of rule 3.9(1) should be given effect. We hope that what follows will avoid the need in future to resort to the earlier authorities.

  • Swain v Hillman
    • Court of Appeal (Civil Division)
    • 21 October 1999

    It enables the court to dispose summarily of both claims or defences which have no real prospect of being successful. The words "no real prospect of being successful or succeeding" do not need any ampflication, they speak for themselves. The word "real" distinguishes fanciful prospects of success or, as Mr Bidder submits, they direct the court to the need to see whether there is a "realistic" as opposed to a "fanciful" prospect of success.

    It is important that a judge in appropriate cases should make use of the powers contained in Part 24. It saves expense; it achieves expedition; it avoids the court's resources being used up on cases where this serves no purpose, and I would add, generally, that it is in the interests of justice. If a claimant has a case which is bound to fail, then it is in the claimant's interests to know as soon as possible that that is the position.

  • Connelly v DPP
    • House of Lords
    • 21 April 1964

    There can be no doubt that a court which is endowed with a particular jurisdiction has powers which are necessary to enable it to act effectively within such jurisdiction. I would regard them as powers which are inherent in its jurisdiction. A court must enjoy such powers in order to enforce its rules of practice and to suppress any abuses of its process and to defeat any attempted thwarting of its process.

  • O'Reilly v Mackman
    • House of Lords
    • 25 November 1982

    The public interest in good administration requires that public authorities and third parties should not be kept in suspense as to the legal validity of a decision the authority has reached in purported exercise of decision-making powers for any longer period than is absolutely necessary in fairness to the person affected by the decision.

  • Council of Civil Service Unions v Minister for the Civil Service
    • House of Lords
    • 22 November 1984

    Legitimate, or reasonable, expectation may arise either from an express promise given on behalf of a public authority or from the existence of a regular practice which the claimant can reasonably expect to continue.

  • Rainy Sky SA and Others v Kookmin Bank
    • Supreme Court
    • 02 November 2011

    If there are two possible constructions, the court is entitled to prefer the construction which is consistent with business common sense and to reject the other.

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